Welcome


The Speech-Language Pathology Clinic will open its doors in the Fall of 2021, as the on-campus clinical training facility for the Institute for Speech-Language Pathology at Widener University.

At the Speech-Language Pathology Clinic, we offer evidence-based, pro bono speech and language therapy services to uninsured, underinsured, and/or underserved members of our community. All services are provided by graduate clinicians in the Institute for Speech-Language Pathology at Widener University, under the direct supervision of licensed, ASHA-certified speech-language pathologists.

We invite you to explore our website to learn more about us, the clinical services we offer, and how you can schedule your first appointment.


Our Mission

The mission of the Institute for Speech-Language Pathology at Widener University is to prepare clinically competent, ethical, community focused, and culturally respectful speech-language pathologists, committed to preventing, diagnosing, and treating communication and swallowing disorders across the lifespan.


Our Vision

The vision of the Institute for Speech-Language Pathology at Widener University is to improve the lives of individuals with communication and swallowing disorders through excellence in teaching, research, and interprofessional clinical service to the community.


Commitment to Diversity

The speech-language pathology program supports and upholds Widener University’s commitment to diversity and non-discrimination as described in the Equal Opportunity, Harassment, and Nondiscrimination Policy (EOHN).


Accreditation

The master of science (MS) education program in speech-language pathology at Widener University is a Candidate for Accreditation by the Council on Academic Accreditation in Audiology and Speech-Language Pathology of the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (2200 Research Boulevard, #310, Rockville, Md., 20850. Phone: 800-498-2071 or 301-296-5700). Candidacy is a “preaccreditation” status with the CAA, awarded to developing or emerging programs for a maximum period of 5 years.